Vision and dreams are the blueprints of soul and achievements.
-Mohammed Ahmed F

Full Stack Web Developer opening in Chennai

Full Stack Web Developer opening in Chennai

Coovum Smart Systems (www.coovum.com) is hiring for its expanding team for the post of Software Engineer (Full Stack Web Developer).

About - Coovum is geared to harness the power of IoT, Robotics & AI with the world-class solutions by leveraging technologies and business growth into new market segments started in Jun 2015 with about 25 dedicated team members.

Qualification - Any diploma / degree in Computer Science.

No. of Positions: 3 Experienced & 2 Freshers.

Candidates with at least 1+ years of experience working in backend technology PHP, MySQL, REST API, JSON, Laravel framework only need to apply.

Interview Process for Experienced candidates:-
Online test.
Candidates will be tested on Data Structures, Algorithms, OS & Networks, Web Technology and Security.
Knowledge of Python, IONIC / PhoneGap / Hybrid App Development will be a plus.
Preference will be given to candidates with 2+ years of experience.

Interview Process for Freshers:-
Online test.
Candidates will be tested extensively on Data Structures, Algorithms, OS & Networks, Web Technology.
Knowledge of Python, IONIC / PhoneGap / Hybrid App Development will be a plus.
Preference will be given to candidates with highly demonstrated skills only.
Preference will be given to competitive programmers with a good rank on HackerRank platform.
Salary package:
Experienced - will not be a constraint for the right candidate.
Freshers - best in industry.

Date of Joining:
Experienced - candidates with 30 days notice period. Preference will be given to candidates already serving the notice period.
Freshers - 1st Dec 2017.

Apply on or before 16-11-2017 to mohammedahmed_f@yahoo.com
10 Rules for Developers to learn English

10 Rules for Developers to learn English

Today's world is about distributed teams across the globe. A team member sitting in the Indian Silicon Valley or a software company of the financial capital of India might be reporting to a manager sitting in Microsoft Headquarters in Redmond, Washington (a suburb of Seattle, Washington, USA). This is almost as if you have traveled around the world. Hence, long-distance communication has become prominent over the last couple of years.

How it matters

But I am technically strong, so how does it matter to me?

Well, if you are really interested in moving up the career ladder then communication is the key. For instance, if you want to be promoted to be a Tech/Team Lead then good communication skills will help in the longer run.


Good communication demonstrates good leadership skills and so helps you to pave the road to new roles and responsibilities. Would you like to send a software architect to a client or listen to him on the phone when he can barely communicate; would you like to work with a team/tech lead or on-site coordinator that can barely explain what the client wants? I am sure not. 

Why English has become so important

Do I really need to explain that? If you are reading this article of mine, then you are in the same boat as I am. In other words, the software development field. English is a global language to communicate with anyone whom you don't know how to connect with. Besides, if you are planning to travel, work abroad, deal with higher management in your company and pave your road in a highly competitive society then a good command of English is like “Cherry on the Cake".

Many deserving candidates are rejected every year for a USA visa (H1B, L1B even studying abroad) in their interview because they can hardly communicate well and can't impress the consulate person who is interviewing the candidate.

Consider that, even for technical interviews, how to express that you are a good candidate and understand the technology. That time is gone when you can cram for the questions and spit them out to the interviewer. The trend of interviews has changed. For instance, now people don't really ask the difference between “Abstract class and Interfaces”. Instead, they will ask you a scenario where you choose to implement an interface instead of an abstract class or vice versa. Even, based on your project description they drag you into a totally un-imagined situation and ask for your views. Such just-in-time situations and scenarios are hard to cram for, or even prepare for. So you end up sharing your thoughts or thought processes during the interview. Do you feel little sweating in your palms or forehead?

Techniques to develop good English communication skills

So what's the technique to have good English communication skills?

The following is the Rule of Thumb as it applies to those candidates whose Mother Tongue or Native language is not English, just like me.

Don't panic about or fear English communication; rather work on it. I can share how I (a small town's boy of Hindi medium from northern India) made it possible. 

Rule #1: Focus on learning English grammar to strengthen the fundamentals. If there is a need to improvise your English grammar then work on it for some time and the remaining can be learned by listening and speaking with others. Here is a good E-Book to strengthen the fundamentals from the basics to the extreme expert level.

Rule #2: Don't focus on accent (American, British and so on) immediately; instead focus on grammar for the correct usage or words and accurate sentence formation. Accent will come automatically later when you work with people across the globe and have developed a good grasp of the language.

Rule #3: Your skills building, in other words learning, must be by using English only. For instance, I see some people prefer to learn technology in their native language. I don't understand how learning .NET or any other topic will help you better in your native language, because most of the terms are English only; C#, CLR, Framework, Language, Compile, Code, Debug and so on. So why to worry so much for some of the plumbing or the gluing together of words in the middle to make sentences.

For example, if I need to learn what is .NET then what is it you won't understand in: “.NET is a platform and framework that allows you to build applications using many .NET compliant programming languages and even deploy and run those on many non-Microsoft platform OSs”.

I am totally against the reading of novels and so on to build an English vocabulary. Instead, start a book of your choice on MVC, .NET, C#, ASP.NET, WCF and so on cover to cover. Yes, cover to cover; you read that right, from the About the Author to About the Technical Reviewer to the Acknowledgement, Dedication and so on and the chapters of your choice. I guarantee that the first few sections has much to teach you about general-purpose English communication. So your time is better invested into building your skills with books of your areas instead of reading a 1000 pages fiction novel like Harry Potter, especially for this cause.

However; if you wish to read a book other than for your technical benefits then reach out to me, I can guide you to some good books that might be helpful in various ways.

Rule #4: Listening is very important. When I was in college I heard people saying that listening to English songs will help you to learn English; well to be honest I never found time to double up my efforts to listen to English songs and then learn my study topics in English. By the way, I also don't recommend listening to English music and trying to read English material at the same time; it could turn out to be pretty messy, especially at the beginner level.

So listen to some of your favorite speakers for the topic of your choice. Listening causes great learning, especially in terms of the usage of words, sentence formation, accent, pitch, pace, sound quality and so on. My YouTube channel MyPassionForDotNet has a couple of videos from 10 minutes in length to 2+ hour-long sessions. 

In your free time, even listen to the people in your office, market, shops, conference calls, elevators, parking and so on. 

Rule #5: No slang language; say “Yes”. I have often seen people saying “yeah” “bro”, “You know after each line”, “cool” and many more terms. Well, I suggest always say “Yes”; believe me this has an impact on your way of building skills. When you are good with English communication then an occasional use of yeah is OK. Basically, this puts you into a habit of strictly respecting the core of the language and also teaching your tongue what to utter, which is very important.

Rule #6: Hang out with the right people. If you know someone that can help you to polish your communication skills then find such people if possible. Well, I was not able to find any because I grew with people like me but time has changed. I am sure you might have someone around you.

Rule #7: Think big, start small. If you are in a discussion then start whatever you can using English and see how far you can go. Anyways, in our native land we speak in a mixed mode (some English and some native language) so instead you should focus on speaking only the English part and as precisely as possible.

Rule #8: Go slow. I have observed many people think that good English communication is all about speaking fast. Actually, that's a myth. I have earned a large amount of my professional experience working outside of India with people from various English speaking continents. One thing I have found common in all of them is that they speak slow, soft and clear. 

Rule #9: Pronunciation, when speaking no matter what language you are using, the way to utter a word is very important. It becomes very important when you speak in English. Here is a great pronunciation tool to help you learn how a specific word is pronounced. 

Some examples; I would like you to try and see what you thought was and actually how these must be pronounced. For example Scythe, calcium, pronunciation.

Rule #10: Get away from your native way of pronunciation. Our native place (town, city, country) has a huge impact on how we learn how to pronounce a word; many times we continue to speak the same way, but with an associated cost with that approach. If you have been speaking incorrectly then it can take a while to practice speaking it right.

For example, most of the Indian people, even Doctors, pronounce Calcium as “Cal-Shi-um” but actually there is no “Sh” sound in it. It's just a very small example of how our native culture has an impact on our way of speaking. Many people have the tendency to add the sound of other letters when speaking something. Try again how most of the people say “Pronunciation” and compare that with the tool I referred to in Rule #9.

Such issues can be fixed with caution, awareness, and practice. There is nothing a human mind can't conquer or achieve. 

So let's summarize the rules:

Rule #1: Learn grammar for better English communication.
Rule #2: Don't focus on Accent immediately
Rule #3: Learn technology in English only; strictly books, audio, video and so on
Rule #4: Listening results in great learning.
Rule #5: No slang, use words that reflect a respect of the language.
Rule #6: Right company, connect with people who speak good English.
Rule #7: Think big, start small.
Rule #8: Speak slowly but steadily and you will win the race.
Rule #9: Pronounce correctly; this is impressive in its own way.
Rule #10: Go global; to some extent, get away from your native tongue and pronunciation.

10 Mistakes done by the developers

10 Mistakes done by the developers

Learning from the top 10 mistakes developers make

I present to you a list of a few common mistakes new devs (and sometimes even experienced) usually do. I believe that learning from these mistakes would be of some help to you. So, here is my pick of the Top 10 mistakes.


10. Trusting user’s input
Never trust the inputs provided by the end user. Also don’t blame them, mostly they do it unintentionally. We all make mistake mistakes. This might not be of great concern to them but a piece of bad data could potentially bring down the application or cause compliance-related issues. Apart from naive non-technical users we also have users with a certain level of technical know-how which they could potentially use to circumvent the system and get their work done. These are the users who pose a threat to your application and application needs to be safeguarded against the malicious activities.

The only option to save from landing into trouble at a later stage is to build a strong validation with self-explanatory and human understandable error messages. Cryptic messages hardly help the naïve user accomplish any task. Validation should be done in both user interface and database level just to be sure that even if by some means front-end validation was turned off the application still does not accept trash values.

9. Manual unit tests
Code changes that you do, needs to undergo unit testing and further rounds of Quality Assurance testing. All tests or at least a few minimum number of tests need to be done to ensure that the changes you made in one unit of code do not have side effects on the others. This is a necessary evil. Having automated unit tests and integration tests save you a lot of manual efforts in validating side effects of the changes.

8. Skipping documentation
The evilest thing that you can do is skipping documentation. Off course you can read the source code and try to understand the functionality. Reverse engineering the functionality from the code is a daunting task. This is good enough for a tiny functionality but definitely not a go for the entire application.

"Requirement changes, code changes and more frequent - members of development team change."

Knowledge about the application might not be transferred 100%. Sometimes people just forget. You need not create dozens of documents, create only a few like requirement specification and technical document and make sure to keep them updated, this should be a part of a stringent process which needs to be followed at any cost and must be accommodated in the project planning. This would help at later stages when the application is in support/maintenance phase.

7. Forgetting about Audit and Error logging
Not all end user/stakeholder would be bothered about cross-cutting concerns like audit logs and error logging. A stakeholder would simply come with a one-liner requirement which you would have to drill down till it becomes good enough to work on and deliver a solution addressing the stakeholder’s problem.

Data change audit and error logging might never be a part of user’s requirement but is implicit that it needs to be maintained. One fine day user would simply approach support team and ask them to provide data related to access and roles or some business critical data required for compliance or audit purpose and then you would have nothing to share.

Error logging is also crucial, you might do defensive coding but you never know what might fail in such cases effective error logging comes in handy. Monitoring error logs and trying to work on resolving recurring error would help in making your application more stable.

6. Careless use of privileged access
First and foremost, full control and access should never be provided. The system cannot protect itself from malicious activities if you leak the superuser or privileged account passwords. Risks involved in the reckless usage of privileged access should be a part of learning for inexperienced new members of development or support team. There might be times when you would have to make a modification to production database and having privileged access can lead to many issues.

“With great power comes great responsibility”

I remember once unintentionally deleting data from the master table and the query was auto-committed. I went cold but soon realized I had taken backup of the data, phew! It is always good to provide limited access for data modification via an interface which keeps data backup. One should also note that this tool should also be capable of doing bulk operations, else you will find yourself doing manual updates for a very long time.

5. Configuration menace
Scattered configurations in different files and database is a menace. Change in a configuration which affects multiple applications would have to be replicated in many files and databases. This probably is not much of an issue if you have a handful of applications but would soon become an overwhelming task when you have hundreds of application in an enterprise environment. Moreover, naked passwords in config files are yet another threat. If configurations are database driven then it reduces the later hazels also safeguards sensitive configuration entries.

4. Hard-coded time bomb
Hard coding values in the program are definitely a bad practice. Strange issues could occur because of the hardcoded value which silently sits there in your source code. One such incident is when you make use of hard-coded values for some maximum number, assuming that the maximum will not be hit. Such cases could take months or years to raise an error. Combined with no error logging and you will be in a very bad situation. Try to avoid hard-coded values. Move them to configuration variables if needed or try to completely avoid situations which would require them.

3. Prevent Burnouts
Working continuously without any breaks will just lead to burnouts. You should always take breaks at regular intervals. When you are overworked even doing simple things take a whole lot of time.

Set small achievable milestones for yourself and don’t forget to reward yourself for it. Chocolates, cakes, quick games just about anything that makes you happy and feel free. Learning how to prevent burnouts will make you more productive.

2. Code / Suggest for building resume
Having a strong resume with a listing of all new technologies is great but don’t just do it for inflating the resume. Learn them but use them only if you see the benefit and high maintainability over the existing things. Sometimes adding new tech options would not even be required.

Increasing the complexity should at least pay off in providing ease of maintainability. So I strongly believe that when you suggest some solution, check if it makes the application easy to maintain and makes everybody’s life easy.

1. Finding comfort zone in just one technology
Being a ninja in one technology is awesome and is always beneficial. But don’t stay limited to one technology. Try to expand your knowledge, sure there is a learning curve but challenging yourself helps you become a better technologist – a person who uses various technologies as effective tools and provides business enabling solution.

Times change, technology may become obsolete but your learning should never stop. Always try to explore new technologies and try weighing the pros and cons before using it as a solution for solving a problem.

I would like to hear about your views on these points. If you have any experiences to share, go ahead and post a comment. Remember…

The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing. ~ John Powell

This article was originally published on Skill Hive Blog
Free Aptitude Test Practice resource

Free Aptitude Test Practice resource

Folks,

It was a pleasure to add PracticeReasoningTests to our Aptitude Practice Website List upon request to add, from Mr. Edward Mellett, Founder & CEO of PracticeReasoningTests.com






It is always our pleasure to add and recommend free resources for the betterment of the student's fraternity.

PracticeReasoningTests.com

-Admin.

Android App Development Workshop by Anna University

College of Engineering, Anna University, Guindy is conducting one day hands-on workshop on Android App Development for students for a nominal fee of Rs. 300/-.
  

Certificate from Anna University and refreshments will be given to all the candidates.

To register contact your slot contact - +919629634955 / +919894006783.

Only limited slots available, block your seat by contacting the mentioned numbers. Also, share this post and let your friends know this opportunity.

Registration for the Android Workshop is now open, register Here - http://www.niral.org/workshop/index.php

35 Bad Programming Habits

There are 35 common bad programming habits.

Well, there are probably more. But 35 sounded cool and that’s all I could think of.

I put the most important ones at #17 and #35 because I’d like for you to read the full answer. I think you’ll find it valuable.


1. Acting like you have all the answers. Don’t cling onto the insecure feeling that you have to know everything. You don’t. And that’s ok.

2. Attending meetings all day. If you spend most of your day in meetings, you should consider spending your time more productively.

3. Acting defensively when someone critiques your code. The best developers are willing to have an open and straightforward conversation about the code they’ve written and how it can be improved.

4. Giving up too soon. Too many programmers get so close to a solution, only to give up right before they’re about to solve the problem.

5. Refusing to ask for help. By going through the process of articulating your problem to someone else, you’ll often discover the solution. This is what is known at “rubber duck debugging.”

6. Passing blame to others. The most valuable developer is the one who takes ownership and responsibility for the code they write.

7. Writing code that prematurely optimizes other code. In most situations, the performance advantage gained from fully optimizing code to the point that it’s difficult to understand is not worth it.

8. Ignoring the opinions of other developers. One of the best ways to learn and grow as a developer is to pair program with developers who have more experience than you. Go seek out other people’s opinions.

9. Not knowing how to optimize code. There are some situations where performance is a big issue, such as problems with:

  • Algorithmic Complexity
  • Inefficient Database Operations
  • Third party APIs
  • N+1 Queries

When performance issues arise, you need to know how to analyze them, understand what is taking the time, and how to fix the problems.

10. Undervaluing relationships with other members of the team. You are hired to write code. But you need to be able to interact with other members of the team, too.

11. Engaging in office politics. Sometimes, other dev teams will make decisions that you think are incorrect. But as long as you can accomplish your team’s objectives, it’s best to simply work around other teams’ quirks, rather than fighting them too hard.

12. Freezing under pressure. When you operate in a scenario where users cannot use the product, there is a ton of pressure. You need to develop the ability to stay calm and get the job done.

13. Being incapable of writing bad code. In the real world, there are trade-offs based on things like:

  • Deadlines
  • Experiments
  • Urgent bugs that need to be fixed immediately
  • You need to have the mentality that it’s ok to write bad code to fulfill the demands at hand.

14. Over-engineering simple problems. Don’t create confusing solutions to easy issues.

15. Acting like a boss. Not a leader. Too many developers don’t know how to manage other people. You should be the person who other devs turn to for guidance and direction- not just step-by-step instructions.

16. Using the wrong tool for the job. Stop making decisions based on “it’s what I know.” You need to be open to using different technologies, languages, and frameworks.

17. Refusing to research coding questions. Google is one of the most powerful tools in a programmer’s toolbelt.

18. Not maintaining a good grasp on your tools. Since you’ll spend a large number of hours using things like text editors, the command line, and other tools to write code, it’s essential to master them. Take the time to learn the tips and tricks that make you more efficient.

19. Avoiding error messages. Code errors happen frequently. They also generally include very valuable information about what went wrong, why it happened, and what lines of triggered the problems. You should seek out error messages, rather than try to avoid them.

20. Counting the hours. The best developers enjoy the time they spend writing code and find themselves getting lost in the in it. It’s not like something will change after you code for 10,000 hours.

21. Refusing to learn from mistakes. This is counterproductive. When mistakes happen, just zoom out and understand these 3 things:


  • What was the ultimate cause of the mistake?
  • Could processes or behaviors be put in place to prevent this category of mistake from happening in the future?
  • Could the mistake be detected sooner and had less of an impact.
  • Refusing to learn from your mistakes will cause you to repeat them.


22. Being afraid of throwing away code. Know that spending three days to write the wrong solution will teach you more falling victim to analysis paralysis.

23. Romanticizing your developer toolkit. Some developers love the text editor known as vim. Others hate it and love the text editor known as emacs. But there will be scenarios where it makes sense to use one over the other

24. Separating yourself from the developer community. There are programming communities all over the place. With organizations like Railsbridge, Girl Develop It and events like RubyConf, RailsConf and much more, there’s so much to discover.

25. Not having a Twitter account. The creators of massive open source projects, like ruby, rails, JavaScript, and other tools, are present on Twitter. Spending time here can give you a glimpse into the minds of the people who design the software that you use.

26. Not giving back to the community. You should embrace the programming community as early as possible. If you do so, you will realize how helpful and friendly it is.

27. Struggling for hours to solve something, solving it, and not documenting it. Every so often, you’ll encounter a strange, really specific problem that someone on the Internet hasn’t solved yet. After spending hours cracking the code on your own, it’s your duty to write the post so that you can help the next person who encounters the problem.

28. Writing too many or not enough comments in code. Comments are essential notes to developers. But like anything, they should be done in moderation.

29. Lazily refusing to update issues for product managers. It’s important for PM’s to get timely updates and know the status of the product (within reason). If you don’t update the issues in a timely manner, it can cause a lot of headaches.

30. Frequently bundling unrelated features into the same initiative. It can be easy to get into the habit of grouping two unrelated things into the same initiative. And if the two different things are both large in scale, untangling the issues can be super complicated.

31. Carefully coming up with a smart plan with other members of the team, only to completely abandon it and change course entirely when one unexpected thing happens. This is pretty much the worst thing you can do.

32. Sticking to a thought-out plan that clearly isn’t working. The only thing worse than abandoning a plan at the last minute is refusing to stop executing a bad idea.

33. Consistently apologizing for the bad code you’re writing. If you find that you’re apologizing for bad code on a consistent base, it could mean that you need to reevaluate your deadlines.

34. Not spending the energy you should performing code reviews. The dev team is in it together and it is every team member’s responsibility to make sure the code that every other members are contributing lives up to the high standards of the team.

35. Not spending enough time mentoring other devs on your team. It’s your job to ensure that your team is learning, growing, and becoming better at programming on a regular basis.

I strongly believe that every developer is a work-in-progress. So it’s totally normal and ok to have these bad habits. In fact, the key to improving as a developer or as any other type of professional is to follow 3 steps:

  1. Recognize that you have bad habits
  2. Find the motivation to change them
  3. Turn that motivation into practice by eliminating the bad habits and developing good ones

If you read this answer, you just finished step one. Now it’s time to go after the next two.

What to consider while promotion?

A successful business depends on reviewing growth and managing resources. It is not about publicity. Now there are modern techniques in business processes. Review and performance management systems have also grown. Reviewing the performance of employees is crucial for their future work. It can make or break an employee. Here are some important points to remember while reviewing performances.

Ability to perform in a team

An employee who cannot work in a team is a burden. Employees need to work with others. This is important for an organisation’s success. Teamwork is also needed to keep up with modern work systems. Team players are necessary. So you need to review employees on their people skills.


Previous work record

Reviewing records of old employees is easier than reviewing the work of new recruits. You need to have a system in place to review new employees. You can do this on a quarterly or half-yearly basis. You also need to have some standards of review. You can use these to grade the performance of all employees. Remember, there is no substitute for performance and hard work.

Creative approach towards a problem

There is tough competition in the market. So it is necessary to think creatively. Innovation is an important measure for performance reviews. This is not just for the marketing or product teams. This is relevant to all departments. Employees can creatively solve problems and develop new processes. You can review their innovation. Thus, you can encourage employees to think in different ways.

Keep emotions out of the picture

Do you dislike an employee for being careless? Do you like someone who works overtime? You need to keep personal emotions out of reviews. Suppose you promote an employee because he or she is having personal problems. This can have a negative impact on your organization’s performance. Reviewers and managers need to be professional and focused during evaluation.

Ability to handle pressure

There is tough competition in the market. Employees have to perform and deliver under pressure. Sometimes the work environment forces an employee to put in extra effort. Some employees can deliver outstanding results in limited time. Such employees are valuable to an organisation. You can use this measure during performance reviews.

Acceptance of responsibilities

Some employees are ready to take up extra responsibilities. They are an asset to the organisation. Work is always increasing. So employees take on several tasks. This also helps organisations to control costs. But not everyone can do it. Someone who is capable of multitasking and also performs well deserves recognition.

Discipline

You need to review an employee on his or her work habits. These include punctuality, dress sense, and sticking to lunch timings. You can also consider how often they go on leave. A casual work environment is different from undisciplined behavior. All employees need to be aware of this. You can review them on these factors.

Conducting fair reviews is important. You may be promoting a non-performing employee. Or you may not be recognizing the efforts of an employee who is performing well. Both can discourage your staff. Review performances from all angles. Then you are likely to have a happy and motivated workforce.

Android and PHP Developers required

Hi, we are hiring. We are into Android + PHP development. Call 8754531574 or drop your resume in sraja3213@gmail.com.

We are looking forward for any degree, no problem if you have arrears or break in employment, all we want is dedication and a will to conquer.


We would give free 200 hours of training on Android too.

We are not a consultant. We are B2l Mobitech Pvt Ltd, located at Velachery, Chennai and we are hiring.

Capgemini hiring Software Developers & Testers

Capgemini - Walk-in interview on 26th November @ Gardencity College, Bangalore.

This is exclusively 2015/16 BSc/BCA (CS/ IT/ Mathematics/ Physics/ Statistics/ Chemistry/ Electronics) with an aggregate of 55% and above in 10th, 12th and UG (Engineers are Not Eligible).

Job Description :

Good understanding and knowledge on programming skills.
Good understanding of Operating Systems (OS), computer fundamentals
Good analytical and problem-solving skills
Should have excellent written and oral communication skills
Should have good interpersonal skills and ability to perform under pressure


Salary : 2.10 LPA

Date of Joining : Immediate

Venue details are follows :-
Company Name - Capgemini India
Designation - Software Developer/ Tester
Interview Date - 26thNovember 2016
Time  - 10:30 AM
Venue - Garden City College
Virgonagar,16th KM, Old Madras Road,
Bengaluru, Karnataka 560049

Note:
Candidates who dont match the eligibility criteria will not be entertained for the process.
Candidates will have to sign a 2-year service agreement/Deed of Indemnity
Candidates should be willing to work in any of the company’s offices across India
Please carry an updated copy of your Resume, any Photo ID proof, Copy of Educational Documents and a Print-Out of this email to attend the Interview

You may report at the venue 15 minutes before the mentioned reporting time.

Wish you all the best!!!

PHP Developers required in Chennai

A leading. Web design & development agency is recruiting web designers / developers for their Chennai office.

No of requirements - 30

Salary - Negotiable as per experience 


Need web designers with experience in Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator
1. Excellent skills in Adobe Photoshop
2. Should have the ability to make clean sleek website interface & templates

Need Web developers with experience in PHP / MySQL
1. Proficient in Wordpress theme integrations
2. Excellent skills in working with WP-Commerce, Woo Commerce etc.
3. Good Knowledge of other CMS like Joomla, Drupal etc.
4. Experience in Magento will be preferred.

Please find the Interview details below,

Interview time - 10am to 5pm

Date - 26th and 27th November (Saturday and Sunday)

Venue:
A2z technologies 
1st floor, Cenotaph Road 1st Street
Teynampet, Chennai - 600 018
Landmark : Opp to Japanese Consulate
Mobile no.: 9884404983 / 84
http://a2ztechnologies.in/